Fans in Bottles

page 4 (31 - 40)

Small Picture
Size
Bottle markings Description (click on small picture to see larger pictures and closeups)
9 1/4" square "quart" with no markings This bottle is a signed Adam Selick bottle with fans, birds, and crosses. It was probably made for D. H. and Mary Grove, whose names are written on either side of the crossbar through the stopper. Selick's signature is on one of the crosses. The decoration, as usual in blue ink or pencil, includes cross-hatching on some of the wooden pieces. (Full image and links to other known and suspected Selick bottles)
11" round bottle, no markings This bottle is a signed Adam Selick bottle, dated 1891 and contains fans, a ladder and birds, like many other confirmed Selick bottles. It is unusual in that it is in a round bottle and larger than other Selick bottles. (Full image and links to other known and suspected Selick bottles)
9 1/4" square "quart" with no markings .This bottle may be an Adam Selick bottle. It has many of Selick's trademark features: a square bottle, fans, and an 1890 date. But it does not have any birds; it uses blue paint on the support pieces and the tips of the fans, and the fans themselves are better done than many of Selick's confirmed work. (Full image and links to other known and suspected Selick bottles)
9 1/2" tall, 3 3/16" square Pharmacy bottle embossed "James Bruce Phamacists Cor Perry & Prospect Sts Cleveland O." This bottle contains two fans, one on top of a frame surrounding the bottom fan. Dangling from the locking stopper are green pompoms; yellow pompoms hang from the upper fan, and multicolored pompoms are glued onto the bottom. The embossing on the bottle has a mortar and pestle as well as the name and address of the pharmacy. In the 1900 census, James Bruce was age 64, proprietor of his pharmacy, which puts the bottle's date probably in he 1880-1910 range. (Full image and picture of the bottle as it was found)
7 5/8" tall,
2 7/8" wide, 1 1/2" deep
medicine bottle, ounce marks (up to 7) and cc's (up to 200), 3VIII on back, H in triangle on the bottom This exquisite bottle was created by Daniel Rose, a famous whittler in his day from Johnstown, PA (died 1921). He was named "Whittler of the Year" in 1898 (by whom is not known) and was written up in The Christian Monitor in 1926. This bottle was a design he made many times: a large fan and several small ones, rabbits and squirrels, and GOD IS LOVE across the front. He signed this bottle "Daniel Rose Johnstown, Pa." and dated it Sept. 21, 1917. (Full image and closeups)
9 1/4" tall, 3 5/8" in diamater 2 part mold up to lip; no markings This bottle contains six fans in three layers on a structure; in between the fans on the supporting beams are several carved figures and objects: a woman with a banjo and a man in a striped (prison?) suit, a clover, cannon, fish, and the letter R. Carved letters J, A, C, and K are placed around the bottom, and a banner on pink ribbon is spread between the top fans, reading JOHN W. HARMON on one side and HAPPY on the other. The stopper reads No. 4 Harmon. (Full image and lots of closeups)
7 3/8" tall, 3 1/4" wide, 1 1/4" deep short flask, no markings; 2 part mold seams up to the lip This bottle contains a single fan attached to a cross support piece which is decorated in pencil with dots, branches, and crossed axes. There are some pieces broken at the bottom of the bottle, including a hatchet, and the side of bottle has been broken. The stopper is most unusual: a celluloid head of a black man smoking a cigarette. The fan's support piece bears the initials "MWA", which stands for "Modern Woodmen of America," and is dated 1911. (Full image and closeup of date)
9 3/8" tall, 3 1/16" square 2 part mold seams up to the lip, no markings This beautiful bottle contains twelve fans in three levels, four on each level facing the outside of the bottle. Hidden from casual view inside the fans, sitting on the support structure, are several blue birds. The bottle has a locking stopper. This bottle was clearly made by the artist who made the insides of the another bottle on this website which was broken and put into a new bottle.
10 1/2" tall, 3" square square bottle, no markings This bottle contains a frame structure with three fans on each level, each interwoven with ribbon and silver cord and decorated with painted dogs. It is not signed or dated but was made by the same maker as several others on this website (one two three and four for sure, five and six probably). (Full image and closeup)
6 1/2" tall, 3 1/4" wide flat-sided oval medicine embossed "Wyeth & Co. Philadelphia" This bottle from the pharmaceutical company Wyeth in Philadelphia, makers of Collyrium among other products, contains a structure with fans on two levels. The fans are decorated with painted dots and woven with ribbons and silver cord. The wood is discolored and the fans faded, but this bottle was clearly made by the same artist who made several similar fan bottles (one two three and four for sure, five and six probably). (Full image and closeup)
10 1/2" tall, 3" square square bottle, no markings This bottle contains a single large fan on a stand whose base is wrapped in tin foil. The stand is further embellished with two other posts which have whittled pieces with dangling tassels, and more tassels hang from the crossbar of the stopper. The entire structure rests on a bed of red and white yarn. (Full image)
12 1/2" tall, 6" wide, 5" deep jug with two loops and some decorative fluting This large jug contains a structure with fans and whittled objects, very similar in form to two known jugs by J. Lacalski. The decorations in this one are in pencil and some paint. The carvings include a ladies' shoe, a horseshoe, a book and a squirrel. The central shaft has carved dice at the top, and four painted birds are on the bottom. The maker made at least one other jug like this and another in a regular quart. (Full image and closeups)